Century Marks

Century Marks

Revere ware

Paul Revere, made famous by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem about his midnight ride, was a Boston engraver and silversmith. Brown University recently discovered a small engraving by Revere that was tucked inside an old medical book donated to Brown by a member of the class of 1773. It shows Jesus being baptized by immersion. Revere was a Unitarian (NPR, April 15).

Normal folk

Since 2010 the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has been running a public relations campaign featuring diverse Americans with the tagline, “I am Mormon.” The aim is to show that “Mormons are not that strange,” said one spokesperson. The More Good Foundation is also backing the church’s efforts to present a good image on the Internet. One of its objectives is to help people searching for information get to Mormon-friendly sites rather than hostile sites run by evangelical Chris­tians and ex-Mormons (Wilson Quarter­ly, Spring).

Driving while black

In re­sponse to the killing of Trayvon Martin in Florida, the Christian Science Monitor interviewed five young black men around the country to find out their reaction and how the Martin case compares to their own experience. All five of them have had experiences of being racially profiled. Lheadry Powell, 25, a teacher and coach in California, says he gets pulled over by police four to five times a month for no apparent reason. It isn’t just the police who engage in racial profiling. White women in particular cling to their purses in their presence or cross the street and walk on the opposite side. Each of these young men have learned to use survival tactics: be nice, look people in the eye, don’t have an attitude, talk yourself out of a tense situation instead of resorting to violence, and always carry things out of a store in a bag (Christian Science Monitor, April 9).

See no evil

When Joe Nocera of the New York Times had a chance meeting with CEO Jamie Dimon of JPMorgan Chase, Dimon asked him why the Times hates banks. Nocera responded that the Times doesn’t hate banks, the country does. Nocera pointed to evidence reported in The American Banker that the nefarious, sometimes illegal tactics used by banks in the foreclosure crisis are now being used by the banks to collect credit card debt. Many banks are outsourcing collection to law firms that harass and sue people, sometimes without clear evidence that the debts are owed. The banks wash their hands of any culpability. The Consumer Financial Pro­tection Bureau is starting to explore these collection tactics (The Week, April 13).

State of religion

Mississippi is the most religious state in the country, according to a Gallup Poll. Eight of the ten most religious states are in the South. Vermont and New Hampshire are the least religious states, and six of the 11 least religious states are in New England. Religiosity in this poll was based on whether respondents say religion is important in their lives and their frequency of church attendance. The most religious states tend to be Republican, the least religious tend to be Democratic (Huffington Post, March 27).