Century Marks

Century Marks

Masterpiece

The French artist Henri Matisse was brought back to health in 1943 by a nurse who later became a novitiate in the Dominican Sisters of Monteil. When she told Matisse about her order’s desire for a new chapel, he set to work designing the chapel, the shape of the altar, the liturgical furnishings and even the vestments. Matisse chose only three colors for the stained glass windows: yellow representing the sun and heavenly light, green for plant life and the earth and blue for the sky, sea and the Madonna. For the windows he drew from Revelation 21–22, the description of the descent of the heavenly new Jerusalem. Matisse said he considered the Chapelle du Rosaire de Vence, perched above the French Mediterranean, his masterpiece (Wall Street Journal, August 18).

Bulldozer verdict

In 2003 Rachel Corrie, a young American activist, was run over by an Israeli military bulldozer while she was protesting the demolition of Palestinian houses. An Israeli judge ruled last month that Israel bore no responsibility in Corrie’s death; she put herself in danger and could have distanced herself from it, the judge said. Bill Van Esveld of Human Rights Watch responded: “The idea that there can be no fault for killing civilians in a combat operation contradicts Israel’s international legal obligations to spare civilians from harm during armed conflict and to credibly investigate and punish violations by its force.” The Corrie family plans to appeal the verdict to the Israeli Supreme Court (New York Times, August 29).

overcoming complexity

Steve Jobs’s success at Apple may have sent the wrong message to some entrepreneurs: to be successful, you have to ignore your family and be ruthless with your employees. Walter Isaacson, Jobs’s biographer, says we should learn lessons from Jobs’s accomplishments, but not from his personality. Stay focused and keep things simple were two principles, among others, that guided Jobs. At an annual retreat with people he considered the leaders at Apple, the group would come to consensus on the top ten things the company should focus on next. Jobs would cross off the bottom seven and say, “We can only do three.” Simplicity of design for Jobs was a way of overcoming complexity, not of ignoring it (Harvard Business Review, April, and Wired, August).

Target audience

Joseph S. Khalil says we miss the meaning of the book of Ecclesiastes (Qoheleth or preacher) unless we understand its central intention, which is to challenge overconfident preachers who claim to know the ways and will of God. “God’s inscrutability is evident in the illogicality of life,” says Khalil. Qoheleth is particularly critical of those who think they know God’s will with respect to reward and punishment. “Who is like the wise man?” Qoheleth asked. The question is a challenge to all human wisdom and understanding; it points to human limitations about knowing the ways of God in the world (Word & World, Summer).

Prayers of two cities

Clergy in Tampa, Florida, and Charlotte, North Carolina, sites of the Republican and Democratic conventions, issued a statement called “A Common Witness.” The statement notes the wide political divisions in the country, encourages those involved in the political process to argue respectfully and not use religion to garner votes, and invites prayers for peace (hydeparkumc.org)